In the Bhagavad-Gita, Krishna speaks about the three modes of material nature or gunas; goodness (sattva), passion (rajas) and ignorance (tamas). Everything we do in life can fall into one of these categories or modes. From what we eat, to how we spend our free time. By trying to include more qualities of sattva in our lives, it will enable us to practise yoga and meditation more comfortably.

The qualities of sattva (goodness) are goodness and it brings about happiness, illumination and well-being.

The qualities of rajas (passion) are desire, passion, action, binds with attachment to work.

The qualities of tamas (ignorance) are darkness, laziness and binds itself to forgetfulness and sleep.

For anyone wanting further information about the material modes of nature, I will be covering these topics in our upcoming retreat and also will do a more detailed blog post on this.

The following recipe uses no onion and garlic as they are considered to be in the mode of passion (rajas) and heating which impedes meditation and yoga practise. Please do feel free to use garlic if you want to.

 

Sattvic Yellow Split Mung Bean Dal

Serves 2-3 as a main

Ingredients:

1 cup split mung dal soaked in water for two hours (soaking can also be skipped and cooked for longer)

1 regular sized tomato chopped into chunks (vine/salad etc)

1 inch of ginger grated or finely chopped

1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds

1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds

6 fresh curry leaves (can use dried also)

¼ teaspoon of aesofitida (hing) -you can get this at all Indian grocery stores. If you eat garlic, you can use ½ -1 clove.

¼ – ½ teaspoon fresh ground black pepper

1 dried red chilli

½ tsp salt

Fresh coriander leaves – small handful

Half a lime

 

Method:

Rinse your split mung beans well under warm water (I generally go for 3 rinses total)

Heat a large saucepan and then add 1 tablespoon of oil. Once warm add in the mustard seeds and wait for them to splutter. Then add cumin, hing, curry leaves, chilli, ginger and turmeric (in that order). Fry for a minute to infuse the oil.

Place the washed split mung beans in the pot with the 3 cups water and bring to the boil

Once it starts to boil, turn the heat down to a low simmer and cook, stirring frequently, for about 20 minutes. Add water as needed for desired consistency. Your mung beans should look well-cooked, almost mushy. You can make it as thin or as thick as you like it.

Add in the chopped carrots and tomatoes and cook for another 10 minutes or until the vegetables are cooked well.

Season with salt, pepper, lime and sprinkle in the coriander.

Say a prayer of gratitude before serving with fluffy rice or chapatti.